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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
by the supreme court could result in the roe v. wade of guy rights. joining me now is political strategist steve elmendorf and chris geithner, senior political reporter for buzz feed. steve, i want to go to you first on this. there has been a lot of discussion and a lot of back and forth whether it's a good thing for marriage equality for the supreme court to take up these issues. some folks think better to leave it at the state level. there has been a lot of progress there. are you bullish or bearish on this? >> i'm bullish. i think the supreme court is going to do the right thing. you know, it's hard to predict, but i think the country has been moving so fast in the right direction. the court is not immune to public opinion. the court is not immune to the wind blowing through the country. and it's so clear where we're moving and the progress we've made in the last five years has been amazing. and i think the court is going to do the right thing. >> chris, let's talk a little bit about public opinion. because we have some polling that shows a breathtaking change of public opinion on this. in 20
. if it did that, that might result in what would essentially be the roe v. wade of gay rights. alex. >> taking up this prop 8 with california, would their ruling necessarily apply then only to california? >> that's possible. it's possible, because the appeals court ruling that comes to the supreme court was designed to apply only to california. what it said is once a state grants an essential right like this, it can't then take it away. remember in 2008 early in the year, this california supreme court permitted same-sex couples to get married, about 18,000 of them did. then prop 8 was passed in the general election putting a stop to it. so if the court just stops there, you're right. it would be a ruling that would apply only to california. if it decides to take that case and get to the constitutional question of whether any state for any reason can deny same-sex marriage couples the right to get married, then it would play nationwide. >> good to see you, pete. thank you. >> you bet. my pleasure. >> now the question of the day. what do you expect the supreme court to do on gay marri
, roe v. wade was thought to be in imminent peril. and i think what 2012 did was to reconfigure all of that. it feels as if the ice is breaking, as if you had three states for the first time through popular vote, for example, endorse same sex marriage. you had the people of california in a popular referendum vote to tax themselves to address their state's chronic deficit. these are things that may in the long run be as important as the re-election of barack obama. >> woodruff: how do you see this year? >> well, in the '80s and '90s there was a tendency to think that the president, voters who vote for president are center right and the republicans had an varntion '80s and '90s. in the wake of this election, you have to go back to 1988 to find a republican president who was elected by anything other than a squeaker, that probably tells something that i think the electorate, exactly as you are saying, maybe is beginning to shift. >> woodruff: but again, we've had moments in history when one party or another seemed to hit a bend in the road, when when popular opinion changed. michael, a
roe v. wade was thought to be in imminent peril. and i think what 2012 did was to reconfigure all of that. it feels as if the ice is breaking, as if you had three states for the first time through popular vote for example endorse same sex marriage. you had the people of california in a popular referendum vote to tax themselves to address their state's chronic deficit. these are things that may in the long run be as important as the re-election of barack obama. >> woodruff: how do you see this year? >> well, in the '80s and '90s there was a tendency to think that the president voters who vote for president are center right and the republicans had an varntion '80s and '90s. in the wake of this election you have to go back to 1988 to find a republican president who was elected by anything other than a squeaker, that probably tells something that i think the electorate, exactly as you are saying maybe is beginning to shift. >> woodruff: but again, we've had moments in history when one party or another seemed to hit a bend in the road when when popular opinion changed. michael, as you
become more divisive than roe v. wade decision. this was troubling. ruth bader ginsburg who is one of the most liberal justices, she in february questioned the timing of the abortion decision and suggests it may have contributed to the on-going bitter debate about abortion. not that the judgment was wrong but it moved too far, too fast. that was from ginsburg. those are the things that make you worry. a little shpilka in my kinectazoid. chris perry who i love is a lot more selfish than i am. [ applause ] they could have gotten married today if they had not taken the course. she said as much as sandy and i want to be married we want everyone in the united states to be able to be married. we've learned to be patient of the process. what we wanted was the biggest boldest outcome as possible. that's still what i'm hoping for so there! [ applause ] hmm! that's what ted olson thinks. he knows a little something a little something a little something about law. joe in pittsburgh, you're on the "the stephanie miller show
roe v. wade and all of that. but this is happening at record pace, more so than i think any civil rights battle. somebody made the point it was because -- more and more people obviously have learned that they know somebody gay, whereas obviously they were saying that the civil rights movement you didn't suddenly discover someone is black. >> right. >> stephanie: but i think as you say they do look at politics, look at the same polling we have, and look at the arc of history, and say a kennedy has the chance to do the brown versus board of education of our time. >> sure. we don't know who voted to take up the proposition 8 case, right? at least four justices have to be supportive of the coming on board. could it have been for liberal justices thinking that kennedy, the presumed swing vote might be with them or those opposed to marriage equality presuming that kennedy might be with them. but i think that the court despite being above the fray, as it were it interacted with the political realities and the world, so it is standoffish but it cannot help being effec
diminished by these activist judges. actually roe v. wade a took away the right to life. we encourage the culture of death by giving money to planned parenthood that kill more people. it's terrible what happened in connecticut, but unborn persons killed with the support of taxpayer money, these are persons, too. host heast your response. guest: i don't see the connection here. and of course, we have seen gun violence against those who actually do provide reproductive services and abortion services, gun violence against doctors. i don't see the connection between the two issues. i do think the respect for life is something we have built on in this country and that means different things to different people. i would respectfully disagree with you on the connection between gun violence and the opportunity for women and their families to make reproductive decisions independent of government intervention. host: chris in florida, democratic caller. caller: i used to hunt and i got rid of my guns. i believe there is one bill that should be put up there and that's that any agent of the federa
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)